Archive for wimbledon

Roddick tanks in 2nd round of U.S. Open

Posted in Tennis with tags , , , on September 2, 2010 by nathanelwell

For the first time in his career, Andy Roddick (#9) lost in the 2nd round of the U.S. Open.  Janko Tipsarevic defeated Roddick 6-3, 5-7, 3-6, 6-7, to head to the third round for the first time.  Roddick’s play could be compared to that of a fat kid after an Oreo binge: slow and lethargic.  In my ever-so-humble opinion, Roddick lost his confidence after the 2009 Wimbledon Final defeat to Roger Federer.  In 2010, Roddick has had the capacity to win tournaments (ATP Brisbane International & ATP World Tour Masters 1000 Sony Ericsson Open), but he can’t win when it matters.  The Australian Open brought a 4th round loss to Marin Cilic, the French Open resulted in a 3rd round loss to someone whose name I can’t pronounce (we’ll say Fred Jones),  and his Wimbledon appearance…well, lets just say he lost in the 4th round to someone he had no business losing to.

Is Roddick losing steam?  Yes.  Why is he losing steam?  Himself.  Or his wife, Brooklyn Decker.  But seriously, Roddick used to be the most dynamic tennis player next to Roger Federer.  Roddick’s energy tonight was spent when he argued with a line judge over a foot fault.  Its one thing if you’re John McEnroe and can throw a tirade during one of your SEVEN grand slam titles.  Its another thing to do it and lose steam.  Could this be the end for Andy Roddick?  Will he soon bow out of competitive tennis?  How many licks does it take to get to the center of a Tootsie Pop?  There is no way to know for sure, but if I were Roddick I would start taking steroids…

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Venus Williams wins 5th Wimbledon singles title

Posted in Tennis with tags , , , on July 5, 2008 by nathanelwell

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

SATURDAY – Venus Williams defeated her sister Serena for the 2nd time in a major tennis tournament, winning in two sets, 7-5, 6-4.  Venus had lost the last 5 major finals against her sister, in the 2002 French Open, 2002 Wimbledon, 2002 U.S. Open, 2003 Australian Open, and 2003 Wimbledon.

There is not much to say about this match except traditionally Venus’ main opponent has been herself.  Today, she held herself together and kept the unforced errors to a minimum.  V. Williams restrained her excitement after winning her 6th and final game in the 2nd set.  I sometimes wonder if Venus and Serena hold two straws before their match to decide which sister gets to win.  But seriously, congratulations to the Williams sisters.  I’m sure their Mom and Dad will have to see-saw between joy and sorrow.

Wimbledon: Home Court Curse?

Posted in Tennis with tags , , , , , on July 1, 2008 by nathanelwell

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Wimbledon is a tennis tournament steeped in British history.  Go all the way back to 1877, and you’ll see the origins of the “world’s leading tennis tournament“.  It began at the All England Lawn and Tennis and Croquet Club, which is where the first men’s singles tournament debuted, which eventually evolved into Wimbledon.  “Lawn tennis” was introduced by Walter Clopton Wingfield, and was originally called “Sphairistike”.  Imagine watching Wimbledon today and seeing the title “Wimbledon Sphairistike Tournament”.  Or if Roger Federer should win another singles tournament, the newspaper would read “Federer Greatest Sphairistiker On the Planet”.  But fortunately, words were changed and “lawn tennis” was created.  Wimbledon is one of the four “Major” tennis tournaments.  The other three are the Australian Open, the French Open, and the U.S. Open.  The Australian and the French Open are played on clay surfaces, while the U.S. open is played on a concrete surface.  This makes Wimbledon the only major that plays on a grass surface.

I’d like to emphasize that Wimbledon is a BRITISH tennis tournament, situated in ENGLAND, established by the ENGLISH.  At the risk of being repetitive, let me explain my over-emphasis.  The last British female to win a Wimbledon Singles Championship was Virginia Wade, back in 1977.  The last British male to win a Wimbledon Singles Championship was in 1936, before World War II.  The last British male to APPEAR in a Wimbledon Final was in 1938, and the last British female to appear in a Wimbledon Final was in 1977.  Between both sexes, that is over 100 years of a Wimbledon Singles slump.  “Why should I care about these useless statistics?” You ask…  Great question!  Since Wimbledon is a British inspired tournament, I have to ask why they cannot get their act together?

As I currently watch the Wimbledon Men’s Singles tournament, I see the only seeded male Briton to make it to the 2008 Singles fourth round, a man by the name of Andy Murray.  He has already come back from a 2-0 deficit and he looks as if he will defeat frenchman Richard Gasquet.  Should he win, he will go into a Quarterfinal match-up against Rafael Nadal (VIVA ESPANA!), who will undoubtedly defeat Murray in 3 sets and will go on to face Roger Federer in the Wimbledon Finals for the 3rd straight year, and Federer will beat Nadal, because Nadal is best on clay.  YAWN…

We may all remember the Briton by the name of Tim Henman, who in the last 10 years, has reached the Wimbledon quarter-finals 4 times, and the semi-finals 4 times as well.  He has never appeared in the Wimbledon Finals, though.

So what chemicals are in the drinking water of the British tennis athletes?  And who poked the hole in their tennis balls?  Set aside the dominance of Bjorn Borg, Boris Becker, Pete Sampras, and now Roger Federer.  I’d like some answers, people!  I’d like to propose a deadline to the British and the Wimbledon tournament.  If they cannot send a Briton into even the FINAL round of singles Wimbledon within the next 10 years, then I would like to see the Wimbledon tournament moved to Augusta, Georgia, and create a “dual tournament” to be called “The Masters”.  I know, some may think “Elwell, you are crazy”.  But seriously.  There needs to be some incentive for the British to play better in the Wimbledon tournament.  They created it for goodness sakes!

Nadal vs Federer

Posted in Tennis with tags , , , , , on June 9, 2008 by nathanjzacharias

Superman had kryptonite. Roger Federer has Rafael Nadal on a clay court. Nadal defeated Federer in the French Open yesterday and added another chapter to one of the greatest ongoing rivalries in tennis today.

Were it not for Federer, Nadal would probably be the number one ranked player in the world. And were it not for Nadal, Federer would have already passed Pete Sampras’ record mark of 14 Grand Slam titles.

They have met in a Grand Slam final a total of 5 times, with Nadal winning three times in the French Open and Federer winning 2 times in Wimbledon. When they meet on a clay court, Nadal is an astounding 9-1. On grass or hard surface, Federer has a 5-2 advantage.

I knew that Nadal had been nearly unbeatable on clay courts, but I was surprised to find that he has an overall record of 11-6 against Federer, including a 9-4 record in all finals appearances.

I decided to take their numbers and line them up against some of the historic tennis rivalries. The more research I did the more classic match ups I found, but for all of our sakes I decided to only list the stats for a few of them.

Match Up

Overall Matches

Grand Slam Finals

Total Titles b/w Both

Federer vs. Nadal

17 (Nadal, 11-6)

5 (Nadal, 3-2)

81

Sampras vs. Agassi

34 (Sampras 20-14

5 (Sampras 4-1)

124

McEnroe vs. Lendl

36 (Lendl 21-15)

3 (Lendl 2-1)

171

Borg vs. McEnroe

14

4 (McEnroe 3-1)

139

The one key factor that can’t be put into a stat is the aura that surrounded the three earlier rivalries I’ve listed. The 5 set match between John McEnroe and Bjorn Borg in the 1980 Wimbledon Final is considered perhaps the greatest of all time. The fourth set required a 20 minute tie breaker, which McEnroe finally won 18-16. He went on to lose the match, but that final set the stage for another 5 set face off in the US Open 2 months later.

Though I didn’t get to watch them, I did get to watch Sampras/Agassi and McEnroe/Lendl. And I remember the “buzz” in the press whenever those pairs would face each other. In Sampras vs. Agassi, it was a match up of the power serve against the power return. In McEnroe vs. Lendl, it was McEnroe’s net game against Lendl’s booming baseline shots.

It’s that kind of mystique that ultimately defines a great rivalry. It seemed like more than just a match up between two top players. It’s as if there were more on the line than just a title.

Though Federer and Nadal gain more of that aura with each match, I don’t think they’re quite on par with the rivalries of old yet. I think they will get there, but only time will tell where their history ultimately ranks. In the meantime, we’re getting to see some great tennis.